Archive for the ‘Hiking with Ben’ Category

Jacob’s Crosscut & Treasure Loop

Tuesday, March 3rd, 2009

Neither Jacob’s Crosscut nor Treasure Loop are in the Superstition Wilderness proper, but they go along the western slopes of the mountain range.

Date Hiked: 27 December 2007

Companions: Ben

Actual Hiking time: 11:30am to 6:30 pm

My mileage notes are deceptive because we actually hiked the entirety of Jacob’s Crosscut, even though the guide hike  has the loop around at Treasure Loop. Once you get past (north) of Treause Loop and the State Park, you get into some relatively pristine and lonely desert. You cross a couple of washes, and then follow the barbed-wire fence until you hit Crosscut Trailhead. This makes for a stupid-easy car-shuttle if so desired.

I deliberately mentioned the restroom at Lost Dutchman State Park because that section of the trail is Far Too Crowded to simply relieve yourself on a palo verde tree.

Why yes, 6:30pm is well past sunset in December. This is why I always carry a flashlight.

Freind of this blog, Roxxan Lizzie has a Flickr set of photos from her hike. She ran out of daylight too.

We lost Bongo, my beloved plastic gorrilla which I used to photograph on my various travels. He has yet to be adequately replaced. I once assumed this blog would be dedicated to Bongo photos, but alas, he is lost. He might still be out there, but the trail gets serious traffic, and its been over a year. I like to think some child found him and is enjoying him for what he is.

Have you seen this toy?

Have you seen this toy?

Pass Mountain and Fish Rock

Monday, February 2nd, 2009

Pass Mountain and Fish Rock Pass

[Part of a series of beyond the page info of the hikes covered in Day and Overnight Hikes in the Tonto National Forest.]

Hiked: 23 November 2008

Companions: Ben and Carolyn ( a co-worker)

More info about the Goldfield Mtns Here.

We actually intended to only hike Pass Mountain Loop. But early on, we took the wide trail that runs along side of the wash, instead of crossing the wash, and didn’t realize the error until we were already on top of bulldog saddle.

So this is one of the Happy Accident hikes in the guidebook.

We circled around the east and then north slopes of Peak 3163 until we re-united with the Pass Mtn trail, where we ate lunch, and engaged in a bit of (futile) geo-caching.

I learned that there is such a thing as productively lost.

The pygmy sag I mention of pg 38

I also learned that I have enough trouble getting back to the car by sunset (a side-effect becoming productively lost) without adding geo-caching to the itinerary.

Carolyn is as fearless as I am, which has many advantages, but it left Ben as the sole Voice of Restraint on the expedition.

The cholla "family" mentioned on pg 38

The cholla "family"

We proceeded counterclockwise around Pass Mountain. That trail is quite a change in culture from the Fish Rock route. While we saw no other people going around Peak 3163, we saw plenty of folks, and dogs, going around Pass Mountain. Too crowded to just hop off the trail and water a palo verde tree, so the restroom on the west side was quite a relief.

I returned on Nov 28th the finish the one section of Pass Mountain that we missed.

The photo of the rock cairn on pg 51 of the guidebook comes from this hike.

Butcher Jones Trail #463

Sunday, January 25th, 2009

Going around the shores of Saguaro Lake.

Tonto NF Services description here.

Flickr set here.

Round Trip 5.25 miles

Date hiked: 5 January 2008

Companions: Ben and Julie

Notes: The overcast day did not lend itself to photography. We were sprinkled on, but te weater was otherwise mild.

This was Julie’s only hike for the guide (she was 8). Our actual hike time was just over 4 hours.

This is the shortest and probably the easiset hike in the guide.

Ben and Julie going down into Burrow Cove

Ben’s Hiking essentials

Tuesday, January 13th, 2009
Today's Guest Blogger

Today

My son, Ben, has prepared a list of hiking essentials (reprinted here with his permission).

LET US BEGIN WITH THE TEN ESSENTIALS. (LISTED BELOW)
1.FIRST AID KIT
2.JACKET
3.LUNCH
4.RAIN PONCHO
5.FLASHLIGHT
6.MAP OR G.P.S. (GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM)
FIRST AID ESSENTIALS
7.BANDAIDS
8.TWEEZERS
9.PAIN PADS
10.SPIRIT
IF YOU HAVE THESE YOU ARE PREPARED.

FIRST AND FOREMOST BE CAREFUL WHO YOU BRING! THE LAST THING YOU WANT IS A RUINED TRIP BECAUSE OF SOMEONE YOU BRING! SO YOU MIGHT WANT TO CONSIDER EXCLUDING MEAN OLD UNCLE JOE WHO HATES SUNSHINE AND BUGS.

Now, for some adult guidance in correlation with the above.
By “pain pads” he means molefoam padding, which is how we got him and his bruised foot out of Cave Creek.
Obviously, a lot of those items could be assumed to be in a good first aid kit.

The line about mean old Uncle Joe came more-or-less from the Tonto guidebook camping tips. That, in turn, was adapted from a template based on Kim Lipker’s Day and Overnight Hikes in the Rocky Mountain National Park.
Add water to your list. If you’re out in the desert – add more water than you think necessary.
I have humped up hills with more water than I really needed, and I have run out of water with miles left to go and the afternoon only getting hotter. There is no question in my mind which I prefer.

These are the adult 10 essentials:
1) water
2) food
3) first aid kit ( band-aids
4) flashlight
5) jacket/rain poncho (or at least one extra layer)
6) knife or multi-tool
7) map/compass and/or GPS
8) bandana
9) sunscreen (I always forget this)

10) Spirit!

(Or, alternately, a signal device such as a mirror or a whistle).