Posts Tagged ‘hammock camping’

I signed book at the Hiking Shack.

Tuesday, June 28th, 2016

 

Every once in awhile it’s just fun to be an author. Like when the marketing guy at Phoenix’s Hiking
Shack
takes a liking to your book, and then notices that the store sells them. Then he might essentially cold call you via Facebook (I’m sure the millennials have a specific term for this) and invite you to come sign them.

 

So I did. Today. Two copies each. Get ‘em while they last.

 

 

Old display at the Shack

These boots are not for sale.

While you’re there, check out the Grand Trunk hammocks they have – at good prices. That’s one (the air bivy shelter system) behind me in the photo. I like Eureka tents (you can see the top of a few) but I prefer to swing, and that shelter system costs less than the tents.

HikeShack book 1

The author standing proudly behind his product. The author standing proudly behind his work.

I haven’t tried the Grand Trunk, because the Emo I was gifted still swings fine under it’s Cabella tarp.

My Camp in Angel Basin

My Camp in Angel Basin. That’s the old hammock ( a Beyer) but I still use that tarp.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hiker’s Shack is a higher end adventure store. They don’t have much for casual family car campers. They DO have good gear fro backpacking, rafting (and other expensive forms of drowning) and climbing. Poke around – they have all manner of cool toys.

And then buy the book. It looks like this if you can’t see it from the photo above. I don’t sign all that many, so this is a slightly rare opportunity.

And I’d really like to go back and sign some more.

 

Arizona Hiking Shack

3244 E Thomas Road in Phoenix.

800 964 1673

The book I'm holding

Link Dump of Daring Do

Thursday, October 8th, 2015

A few links I’ve run across that explore the line between fun and crazy:

Not for the weak of heart – or bladder.

This is the group campsite of the 3rd annual Highline Meeting last September in the Dolomite Mountains of Italy. The Highliners are, it appears, a loose collection of high-wire athletes. Their website: http://highlinemeeting.com/

Video from here: http://www.planetmountain.com/english/News/shownews1.lasso?l=2&keyid=43072

 

Backpackerverse listicles the 25 most dangerous trails in the world.

Outside online gushes over the Earthcruiser Adventure RV

And finally French hikers breaking a bridge in New Zealand with their Go-Pro going:

You’re welcome.

 

 

Tule Mesa – the backstory

Saturday, June 13th, 2009

About five years ago, Ben (then 7) and I climbed into a Chevy Cavalier and headed off for Fossil Springs. My plan was to intorduce Ben to backpacking. The problem wit this plan was that I was driving.

From Phoenix, I-17 to AZ 260 to FR720 seemed kinda dull, especially when my AZ Gazetteer showed a more direct route through Dugas. I should not here, in some feeble defense, that the Gazetteer does nt reliably indicate a road’s condition – just its existence.

I should also note that my wife will never allow e to own a 4WD the way you would not want to give a loaded pistol to a monkey. I have little to no fear of road conditions.

Forest Road 68G – which will, actually, bounce you down to the Verde River from Dugas – is high clearance up to the edge of the mesa. I bounced and prodded the poor Cavalier that far in anyways – because that is how my mental disorder manifests. We stopped at the top of the mesa, because the switchbacks going down were CLEARLY 4WD. And my nerves were shot. And we were losing daylight. And this moment of clarity saved certainly both of our lives.

So you know, to continue on the Fossil Creek, you would have to ford the Verde River and drive through the Hot Springs campground to get back to FR 720.

So we camped at the top of Tule Mesa. My hammcok, strung from a huge juniper, swung in the wind as I had nightmares of rocks moving down a roadway in waves like an incoming tide. The wind picked even more, and I had to move into Ben’s tent.

The next morning, I worked the Cavalier slowly off the mesa, blowing two tires in the process. (Happily, one was just a slow leak). We ended up “backpacking” in a few miles from a spot north of Lake Pleasant.

Ben and I didn’t make it to Fossil Springs until we hkedt for the guidebook about a year ago.

In a few hours, though, we’re going back to Tule Mesa, because I now own a high clearance vehicle.

I left a ratchet strap in that Juniper. Ben wonders if its still there. We’ll let you know.

Eastern Superstitions

Friday, March 13th, 2009

The eastern half of the Superstition Wilderness is higher elevation and much more isolated. Much of this is because none of the trailheads are easy to reach in a passenger vehicle, and several absolutely require a 4WD.

Astute readers will notice that the Angel Basin hike and the Oak Flats hike were both smaller parts of the Eastern Superstitions Super-loop. Why yes, I covered them all in the same expedition.

And I cover them all in the same blog entry.

DATE HIKED: 24-26 April 2008

COMPANIONS: Te-wa, Nonot and Wally Farrak [I’m using their alias’ from HikeAZ.]

START TIME: Friday, 4/24/08 9:15 am

END TIME: Sunday 4/26/08 around 2pm.

ACTUAL TOTAL MILEAGE: 32.3 miles

The guys were worried when I told them I was writing a guidebook (and hence mumbling into my DVR at random intervals) that their antics might appear. I assured them, truthfully, that guidebooks were not structured like that. I’m going to keep that level of privacy except to note that I was, by far, the slowest of the quartet. On the first day, they’d occasionally double back just to make sure I was still with them. By the third day, however, they had resigned themselves that I would get there eventually. On Sunday, they all reached the car easily by noon.

We have a lot of pix:

If yer new – I camp in a hammock. I was able to use it both nights.

My Camp in Angel Basin

Hammock by Byer of Maine. Tarp from Cabela’s. The photo on the left – from Angel basin – the hammock is actually suspended over a coil of discarded barbed wire.

More information about the Solado People who built the prehistoric exurb of prehistoric Phoenix.

The agony of de feet. [Sorry.]

Duct tape and athletic tape – mandatory for a backpacker’s first aid kit. Happily, this is morning of day 3.

And finally, some of the varied terrain we hiked through: