Archive for November, 2012

Arizona wilderness news round-up for November 2012

Wednesday, November 21st, 2012

Here’s what’s happening in and around the wilder country of Arizona:

Forest Service to Offer Workshop in Williams on Applying for Jobs

WILLIAMS, Ariz. – The Kaibab and Coconino National Forests are offering a workshop in Williams on applying for Forest Service jobs. The workshop is sponsored by the Coconino and Kaibab National Forests’ Civil Rights Action Group.

The workshop is scheduled for the following date, time and location.

• Nov. 28; 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.

• Williams High School Library, 440 S. 7th St., Williams

• Contact: Margaret Hangan, (928) 635-8342, mhangan@fs.fed.us

Participants in the workshop will receive guidance and training on applying for permanent and seasonal Forest Service jobs. Current employees will be available to help lead individuals through the application process.

The workshops are intended for anyone interested in applying for Forest Service jobs. However, to be considered for employment, applicants must be 18 years of age or older at the time they begin work.

Information will be available on local, nationwide, seasonal and permanent positions with the agency. Career fields within the Forest Service include fire, range, timber, recreation, wildlife biology, botany, geology, hydrology, law enforcement, human resources, budget administration and more.

To view information about employment on the Kaibab National Forest, please visit www.fs.usda.gov/goto/kaibab/employment. To view information about employment on the Coconino National Forest, please visit www.fs.usda.gov/main/coconino/about-forest/jobs.

 

Game and Fish launches new “Recreational Access Arizona” web mapping tool

The Arizona Game and Fish Department has launched an exciting new web-based mapping tool, “Recreational Access Arizona,” that provides hunters, anglers, and other outdoor recreationists with important information about access to and through private lands.

The free tool, which utilizes GIS mapping technology, is available at www.azaccessmap.com.

Recreational Access Arizona was developed as part of the Game and Fish Department’s efforts to secure, maintain and enhance public recreational access to private lands, or to federal or state-owned lands that are “land-locked” by private lands. It provides a wealth of other information as well.

Want to see the boundaries of the Game Management Unit you’re in or where water catchments are located? Are you interested in what wildlife species are in a particular area? All the information is available with the click of a mouse anywhere on the map. The more places you click, the more information you can find.

To help get you started, just click on the “How to Use the Map” link in the upper right-hand corner of the page after you’ve logged on.

Even more exciting is that you can create your own map using this tool with a topographic map, aerial images, or street maps as the background. Just export the map you make and print it out on your home printer, or take it in to a printing service to print a large map.

Development and maintenance of this tool was made possible through a grant that Game and Fish received from the Voluntary Public Access and Habitat Incentive Program, which is a federal program authorized in the 2012 Farm Bill.

The department plans to add information that is useful to hunters and other outdoor recreationists over time, so users are encouraged to use the “Send Comments” link in the upper right-hand portion of the web page to e-mail comments for consideration.

For more information, visit www.azaccessmap.com.

It is this author’s opinion that this site is actually really, really cool – but I look at maps for fun!

 

Tonto NF Has No Plan to manage wild horses

So rumors of a round-up/slaughter are just rumors. From Neil Bosworth, Forest Supervisor:

Phoenix (June 11, 2012) — There is apparently misinformation circulating on the internet and in the media that there is to be a “roundup” and “slaughter” of horses on the Tonto National Forest.

We have been contacted by many people to express their concerns and would like to reassure them:  There is no formalized plan for managing the horses on the forest. Forest specialists are still gathering information and looking at all options. No plan will be fully formalized until data gathering has been completed and options for herd management fully explored.

A multi-agency working group was formed in 2011 to effectively manage the growing horse population on the forest which is posing increased safety hazards to both horses and human visitors. During their initial meetings, the group focused directly on researching a contraception program which was being effectively used by the Salt River Pima Indian Community for horse herd management. That community’s program is considered a benchmark to evaluate the possible success of a contraception program for the forest horses.

After this year’s wildfire season is over, it is planned that the group will continue meeting as forest specialists continue to gather information, such as what size the herd is, what the age and gender count is, etc.

New guys in charge

Neil Bosworth is the new guy for Coconino NF:

Phoenix (July 10, 2012) — Neil Bosworth, new forest supervisor appointed to the Tonto National Forest, reported last month from his former position as a member of the Forest Service Legislative Affairs staff in Washington, D.C ., where he worked on national level policy issues such as climate change, fire and fuels, and wilderness designation.  He is accompanied in his re-assignment by wife Amy and two children, Reid and Maggie.

“Amy and I are thrilled to be back out West and I am excited to be leading one of the crown jewels of the Forest Service.  The Tonto National Forest is one of the most-visited, complex, and diverse national forests in the nation,” stated Bosworth.  “It’s just a fascinating forest, with its ecological diversity and high recreation use — a destination forest for Arizonians as well as visitors from all over the world.”

 

Jim Zornes is the new guy in charge of Apache/Sitgreaves:

The anticipation on who the next leader of the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forests (ASNFs) is over. He’s already on the Forest! Deputy Forest Supervisor Jim Zornes has been named as the new ASNFs’ Forest Supervisor assuming former Forest Supervisor Chris Knopp’s position, who retired in November 2011. “We are fortunate to have Jim assume the role as Forest Supervisor. Jim’s two year tenure on the ASNFs will allow no time lost in continuing the important work being done there,” according to Southwestern Regional Forester Corbin Newman.

Before coming to the ASNFs Zornes was the District Ranger of the Mena/Oden Ranger District, Ouachita NF in Arkansas; before that he was District Ranger on the Leadville Ranger District, Pike/San Isabel NF, Cimarron and Comanche National Grassland in Leadville, CO. He began his career with the Forest Service in Oklahoma after graduating from college in Arkansas. His career took him to Oregon for nearly six years before leaving to purchase a farm in his native state of Arkansas before coming back to the USFS in 2001.

“I’m honored for the opportunity to live and work in the beautiful White Mountains of Arizona. I look forward to working with local leaders and the communities to engage in collaborative solutions to natural resource challenges and opportunities on the ASNFs. My wife Joan and I are pleased to continue being a part of the White Mountain community,” Zornes said.

 

Every NF in AZ still has Christmas Tree Permits

Except the Coronado NF – which never has them.

Outdoor Expo (garage Sale) in Payson
From the Payson Round-up:

Both seasoned and amateur fishermen will have a golden opportunity to rub elbows with some of the state’s finest anglers at the 2nd Annual Let’s Talk Fishin’ Outdoorsman’s Yard Sale on Dec. 8 at the Payson Senior Center, 514 W. Main St.

Professional anglers Clifford Pirch, Matt Sura and Andy Manahl will attend to share some of the secrets, as will Johnny Johnson of the television show, “Fishing with Johnny Johnson” that airs Sunday Mornings on Fox Sports Az.

All are expected to be on site most of the sale hours of 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.

In addition to the presence of the professionals and Johnson, a yard sale will feature new and almost new fishing items and free gifts will be awarded to children 14 years of age and younger.

The article has more info. For more information about the upcoming Outdoors Yard Sale, call Purtee at (928) 978-3659 or email: lets talkfishin@gmail.com.

 

US and Mexico agree on the fate of Colorado River flow

Might as well just read the Nat Geo article.

 

Leaving behind unilateralism, the two countries united to sign the most important bilateral Colorado River agreement since the 1944 Treaty.  The term of the agreement is short – five years– but the framework it sets and the tools it provides are exactly the kind of innovations that will be needed for both the river and the communities who use it to weather the impacts of climate change.

Good for all of us!

Brins Mesa / Soldier Pass Loop

Friday, November 2nd, 2012

Been a while, I know. If I made a bunch of excuses, would that interest you? Me neither.

So here’s the behind-the-hike for the  Brins Mesa / Soldier Pass hike in the book (Five Star Hikes in Flagstaff and Sedona)

 

HIKE DATE: 5/7/2010

COMPANIONS – NONE

START: 1:30P

END: 6:30P

8.4 MI TOTAL – 5hrs and 5miles by GPS

One of the first hikes I did for the book, and one of the best in terms of both the quality of the experience and lack of disaster. All of the recording gear worked and I finished in daylight with a swallow of water left.

All of the well documented vortex sites in Sedona are conveniently located within a short walk from a parking lot. My efforts to find any additional documentation on the “vortex” around the slick rock on the side trail to the arch caves came to naught. I have no sense for these things.  The published material is all about the parking lot sites. If you want anything deeper, you’ll have to pay a guide – which was well outside my margins, and a crap-shoot in any case.

The arch caves are cool, but they are no more than a few feet deep.  You won’t need a flashlight.

You Tube notes are here: